Deadline Extended: CASDW/ACR Conference Proposals now due February 11

CALL FOR PAPERS (Bilingual PDF Version)

Eleventh Annual CASDW/ACR Conference

Circles of Writing Studies

University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

June 1 – 3, 2019

Plenary: Andrea Lunsford, “What’s Talk Got to Do with It: Rethinking the Writing/Speaking Relationship”

Closing Plenary: Anthony Paré, “Circles of Influence: A Tribute to Some Thoughts and Thinkers”

We invite papers on all aspects of writing studies for the eleventh annual conference of CASDW/ACR, the largest gathering of writing studies scholars in Canada.  In particular, we invite papers connecting with the Congress 2019 theme, Circles of Conversation, and our theme, Circles of Writing StudiesThe Congress theme opens space for “dialogue, debate, dissent,” so “people can speak with one another, listen, and learn together.” To this end, our conference focuses on core circles within which our field operates, within which we operate, continuing conversations about writers and writing happening amongst organizations dedicated to the study, teaching, and learning of writing.

Circles of Research

We invite papers, panels, and workshops that draw on work in writing studies, genre studies, rhetorical theory, writing centre theory and practice, and professional and technical writing research and practice. We welcome presentations, papers, and workshops that connect with CASDW’s heritage as a place for sharing research on technical and professional writing as well as those that examine all contexts of discourse and writing, including the relationship between writing and speaking, and pedagogical practices and innovations related to writing and discourse.

Crop Circles

We invite papers, panels, and workshops that focus on the visibility, partial visibility, and invisibility of writing studies through discussion of models at the institutional and course level. Vantage College at UBC will chair this session and present their model and physical space.

Circulation

We invite proposals for very brief reports on recent research, new pedagogical initiatives, work-in-progress, follow-ups on papers presented in past conferences, and just about anything else that would be of interest to our members. Presentations in these sessions will be strictly limited to 5 minutes and 5 slides. These sessions should provide a quick overview of the current state of research in our field and help to connect members with colleagues with interests in common.

References

Congress 2019 Planner’s Guide

Partridge, E. (1958). Origins: A short etymological dictionary of modern English. New York: Macmillan Co.

Extended Deadline:  February 11, 2019

For more information about CASDW/ACR and to join the association or renew your membership, please visit our How to Join page. More information about the Congress 2019 can be found here.

CASDW 2019 Proposal Requirements

NOTE: Please submit your proposal as a .docx file and use your title (avoid using punctuation) to name your file, e.g., “AnExaminationofWritingPeerMentorsinaBiologyCourse”

  1. Title and a short (75-word) description for the program
  2. Keywords, e.g., rhetorical genre studies (to help identify reviewers with appropriate expertise)
  3. Name, title, institutional affiliation, & email for ALL presenters
  4. Session format

CIRCLES OF RESEARCH and CROP CIRCLES

INDIVIDUAL PRESENTATION: 15- to 20-minute individual paper presenting the results of new research or focusing on a pedagogical issue or innovation.

PANEL PRESENTATION: 90-min panel (3-5 speakers) comprising a collection of individual papers on a shared topic of interest related to discourse or the teaching of writing.

WORKSHOP: 90-min workshop (run by any number of facilitators) focusing on a particular question, issue, or problem.

Abstract for the proposed presentation (400 words maximum, plus references)

For individual papers and panels, please

  1. describe the research question or pedagogical issue or innovation;
  2. establish its significance;
  3. outline the theoretical framework and research method;
  4. highlight key findings (and, optionally, implications);
  5. include a brief reference list.

For workshops, please

  1. describe the facilitator(s), their role(s), and relevant expertise;
  2. state the question, issue, or problem;
  3. establish its significance;
  4. outline the objectives and framework, including activities in which participants will engage.

 CIRCULATION

Abstract for the proposed 5 x 5 presentation (100 words maximum)

  1. include list of slides and bibliography

Extended Deadline:  February 11, 2019

Please email proposals and inquiries to the program chair, Dana Landry.

All proposals will be subject to blind review. Proposers will be notified of their acceptance status by February 28, 2019 and must register for the conference by March 1, 2019.

Job Opportunity: Tenure-Track Instructor, Rhetoric and Communications, UBC Okanagan

The Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus invites applications for a tenure-track position in Rhetoric and Communications at the rank of Instructor (Educational Leadership Stream). Preference will be given to those with expertise in multilingual literacy and language acquisition. Expertise in Indigenous inclusive pedagogy and/or teaching experience in related fields such as WID (Writing in the Disciplines) or EAL (English as an Additional Language) would be an asset. The successful candidate will be a member of the English Program in the newly formed Department of English and Cultural Studies. The starting date is July 1, 2019.

The responsibilities of this position will include intensive undergraduate teaching and the development of introductory courses in writing and communications as well as collaborative curriculum development in the areas of writing and multilingual communications. The successful candidate will also develop curriculum in Rhetoric and Communications at the senior undergraduate and graduate levels. Service responsibilities will be commensurate with rank and will contribute to the development of writing and communications studies.

Candidates must have a completed Ph.D. (or equivalent) in English or a closely related field and provide evidence of the following: expertise in teaching and successful curriculum development; teaching awards and/or other marks of distinction in instruction; and presentations or publications related to the pedagogy of composition and writing instruction, particularly in the multilingual classroom.

This position will be dedicated to teaching first- and second-year courses in the English program and to curriculum development. As UBC’s Okanagan campus implements a redesigned Bachelor of Arts degree, and as the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies collaborates on curriculum and programming with other Faculties, we are looking for a candidate to take a leading role in the development of learning opportunities in writing, communications, and rhetoric.

This is a tenure track position in the Educational Leadership stream. Promotion and tenure for this stream requires evidence of excellence in teaching, demonstrated educational leadership, and involvement in curriculum development and innovation.

How to apply:

To apply for this position please visit the link:  www.facultycareers.ubc.ca/32563

Application material must include the following:

  • a letter of application, a curriculum vitae,
  • a statement of teaching philosophy,
  • evidence of relevant teaching experience and teaching effectiveness,
  • samples of scholarship in the areas of rhetoric and communication and/or teaching and learning.

Candidates must also arrange for three letters of reference to be emailed to Dr. Michael Treschow, Head, Department of English and Cultural Studies at recruitment.fccs@ubc.ca, with the phrase “Rhetoric and Communication” in the subject line.

Applications will be reviewed starting February 28, 2019.

Call for Papers: Eleventh Annual CASDW/ACR Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS (Bilingual PDF Version)

Eleventh Annual CASDW/ACR Conference

Circles of Writing Studies

University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

June 1 – 3, 2019

Plenary: Andrea Lunsford, “What’s Talk Got to Do with It: Rethinking the Writing/Speaking Relationship”

Closing Plenary: Anthony Paré, “Circles of Influence: A Tribute to Some Thoughts and Thinkers”

We invite papers on all aspects of writing studies for the eleventh annual conference of CASDW/ACR, the largest gathering of writing studies scholars in Canada.  In particular, we invite papers connecting with the Congress 2019 theme, Circles of Conversation, and our theme, Circles of Writing Studies. The Congress theme opens space for “dialogue, debate, dissent,” so “people can speak with one another, listen, and learn together.” To this end, our conference focuses on core circles within which our field operates, within which we operate, continuing conversations about writers and writing happening amongst organizations dedicated to the study, teaching, and learning of writing.

Circles of Research

We invite papers, panels, and workshops that draw on work in writing studies, genre studies, rhetorical theory, writing centre theory and practice, and professional and technical writing research and practice. We welcome presentations, papers, and workshops that connect with CASDW’s heritage as a place for sharing research on technical and professional writing as well as those that examine all contexts of discourse and writing, including the relationship between writing and speaking, and pedagogical practices and innovations related to writing and discourse.

Crop Circles

We invite papers, panels, and workshops that focus on the visibility, partial visibility, and invisibility of writing studies through discussion of models at the institutional and course level. Vantage College at UBC will chair this session and present their model and physical space.

Circulation

We invite proposals for very brief reports on recent research, new pedagogical initiatives, work-in-progress, follow-ups on papers presented in past conferences, and just about anything else that would be of interest to our members. Presentations in these sessions will be strictly limited to 5 minutes and 5 slides. These sessions should provide a quick overview of the current state of research in our field and help to connect members with colleagues with interests in common.

References

Congress 2019 Planner’s Guide

Partridge, E. (1958). Origins: A short etymological dictionary of modern English. New York: Macmillan Co.

Extended Deadline:  February 11, 2019

For more information about CASDW/ACR and to join the association or renew your membership, please visit our How to Join page. More information about the Congress 2019 can be found here.

CASDW 2019 Proposal Requirements

NOTE: Please submit your proposal as a .docx file and use your title (avoid using punctuation) to name your file, e.g., “AnExaminationofWritingPeerMentorsinaBiologyCourse”

  1. Title and a short (75-word) description for the program
  2. Keywords, e.g., rhetorical genre studies (to help identify reviewers with appropriate expertise)
  3. Name, title, institutional affiliation, & email for ALL presenters
  4. Session format

CIRCLES OF RESEARCH and CROP CIRCLES

INDIVIDUAL PRESENTATION: 15- to 20-minute individual paper presenting the results of new research or focusing on a pedagogical issue or innovation.

PANEL PRESENTATION: 90-min panel (3-5 speakers) comprising a collection of individual papers on a shared topic of interest related to discourse or the teaching of writing.

WORKSHOP: 90-min workshop (run by any number of facilitators) focusing on a particular question, issue, or problem.

Abstract for the proposed presentation (400 words maximum, plus references)

For individual papers and panels, please

  1. describe the research question or pedagogical issue or innovation;
  2. establish its significance;
  3. outline the theoretical framework and research method;
  4. highlight key findings (and, optionally, implications);
  5. include a brief reference list.

For workshops, please

  1. describe the facilitator(s), their role(s), and relevant expertise;
  2. state the question, issue, or problem;
  3. establish its significance;
  4. outline the objectives and framework, including activities in which participants will engage.

 CIRCULATION

Abstract for the proposed 5 x 5 presentation (100 words maximum)

  1. include list of slides and bibliography

Extended Deadline:  February 11, 2019

Please email proposals and inquiries to the program chair, Dana Landry.

All proposals will be subject to blind review. Proposers will be notified of their acceptance status by February 28, 2019 and must register for the conference by March 1, 2019.

Save the Date: CASDW Conference 2019

Eleventh Annual CASDW/ACR Conference

When: June 1-3, 2019

Where: University of British Columbia

Proposal deadline: January 25, 2019

A full Call for Papers will be posted soon for the eleventh annual conference of CASDW/ACR, the largest gathering of writing studies scholars in Canada. 

Job Opportunity: Director, Writing and Communication Center, MIT

MIT seeks a Director for the Writing and Communication Center (WCC) beginning Fall 2019. MIT’s WCC focuses on advanced professional communication skills with a particular emphasis on STEM fields. MIT values the development of communication skills of its students and the Director of WCC is expected to provide leadership, strategic vision, and innovation designed to advance practices that aid in that pursuit. This is a full-time (12-month) renewable non-tenure track position. The initial appointment to this position would be for five years. The WCC is open to faculty, postdocs, undergraduate and graduate students, alumni, and staff, and provides clients with professional one-on-one instruction in all stages of the communication (oral, written, digital) process from drafting to revision. The Director of the Center is responsible for overseeing its daily operation, providing training and supervision for the professional tutors (lecturers) that staff the Center, collating program evaluation and usage data, administering WCC policies and practices, overseeing the WCC website, and producing annual reports. The Director is also expected to teach the equivalent of two classes per year, tutor students across the disciplines, present workshops to relevant groups, promote the WCC within MIT, and coordinate efforts with the Writing, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication program.

More information about this position can be found here.